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20090926

Fast Charlie, the Moonbeam Rider


Faxon, Oklahoma.

Well. At last. Here is the part that this famous building in Faxon, Oklahoma played in the movies. David Carradine who died this year, starred in "Fast Charlie, The Moonbeam Rider" a movie that had little going for it but a chance to see a bunch of antique motorcycles in action. Pirate copies are available but expensive.

You’ll have to look sharp. It is only on the screen a few seconds.






Aren't you glad you waited?





The Profile
(more than you
really
wanted to know)

is here.










Betty Boop

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19 Comments:

  • At Saturday, September 26, 2009 10:32:00 AM, Blogger Twilight said…

    Is that all? Huh? Surely they didn't trek all the way to Oklahoma just for one fleeting second's filming of a derelict building?
    Very strange.

     
  • At Saturday, September 26, 2009 6:04:00 PM, Blogger anyjazz said…

    I should watch the whole movie to see if there might be another glimpse of that building or others in the area.

     
  • At Wednesday, January 06, 2010 7:01:00 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said…

    hello Iam roy eggens how much are the copy of the movie you can send it to reggens@hotmail.com tank you

     
  • At Wednesday, January 06, 2010 11:20:00 AM, Blogger anyjazz said…

    Thanks for your comment. I sent you an email with the information.

     
  • At Tuesday, March 23, 2010 3:44:00 AM, Anonymous Tony said…

    I was there.. well, at least when it was filmed in Marietta, Oklahoma. cool vid, short but cool.

     
  • At Thursday, July 29, 2010 11:57:00 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said…

    They were on location near Lake Murray Olahoma. I worked in a nice steak house near the lake and Brenda Vaccaro and David Carradine would come in and eat dinner in the evening. David Carradine would serenade with his guitar. A guy I knew on the lake who was really into boating started sporting Brenda around on the lake. A lady that I knew from the restaurant did a notary for Brenda as she was divorcing one of her husbands at the time. All in all they were very nice people and seemed to really like the folks in Southern Oklahoma.

     
  • At Thursday, July 29, 2010 1:18:00 PM, Blogger anyjazz said…

    Thanks Tony and Anonymous. I am glad the picture brought back memories for you. I guess it is true that some celebrities are really nice people.

     
  • At Thursday, September 16, 2010 10:48:00 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said…

    I appeared in several shots of the movie as an extra, including a couple of scenes with David Carradine. Then and now, I was a fan of Peckinpah's films, so it was a pleasure for me to meet L.Q. Jones and R.G. Armstrong during the filming; they stopped by an art studio owned by a painter friend of mine, Ken Watson, and he introduced them to me. The plot of the film concerns a transcontinental motorcycle race with a finish line in San Francisco. The filmmakers decided the late-19th, early-20th century buildings in Guthrie, Oklahoma, would be a suitable substitute for early-20th century San Francisco. I was involved in the shooting around Guthrie. Many years later, I had occasion to speak with L.Q. Jones, who not only acted in the film, but, as I recall, owned the property or at least a piece of it. He told me the screenplay was the best he'd ever read but the director mishandled it. I told him I'd made $35 a day as an extra, plus breakfast and lunch. "My friend," he said, "you came out ahead of me on that deal." Cracked me up: I'll always remember that. Vaccaro was indeed in the throes of relationship strife, and was in the gossip columns at the time; therefore, she stayed pretty secluded. Carradine seemed to be enjoying "nature's bounty" freely, as one might say, but he also seemed to be an affable guy; I remember he was very generous in signing autographs for the kids who showed up where the trailers were parked. It was an enjoyable experience for me. Kip -- www.wkstratton.com (not the same W.K. Stratton who acted in a number of TV series)

     
  • At Thursday, September 16, 2010 12:51:00 PM, Blogger anyjazz said…

    Thanks Kip. That’s very interesting background color and personal experience. It adds a little more life to the Faxon story.

    When I spotted the empty building while driving down a state highway, I just had to stop and take some pictures. I had no idea that it would gather such interest here on Blogger and on Flickr. Just click on the photo of the building and you will go to the Flickr comments.

    Thanks again!

     
  • At Monday, January 17, 2011 10:43:00 PM, Anonymous Louis said…

    I was about 17 years old and also was in a couple of shots in the film as an extra that was filmed in Guthrie, Oklahoma. as he finished the race and putted into town, I was the kid holding the back of his motorcycle and played the drum in the band as he went to the grandstand. I have never seen the movie, now at 49 years old. I would like to. Where can I get it.

     
  • At Tuesday, January 18, 2011 6:01:00 PM, Blogger anyjazz said…

    I don’t remember for sure where I got my copy. I think it was hondahog. I no longer have it. Here are two places that it can be ordered.

    http://www.hondahog.com/drcatalog/product.asp?intProdID=293

    http://www.ioffer.com/i/Fast-Charlie-the-Moonbeam-Rider-DVD-Antique-Bikes-26916936

    The service was fast and the copy was very good.

    Good luck.

     
  • At Monday, February 14, 2011 10:03:00 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said…

    I was about 15 when they were filming Fast Charlie. My Dad was a Park Ranger at Lake Murray. He was assigned to the movie company for security while they were in the area. He took me out to the set I met L.Q. Jones. Dad asked L.Q if I could see the motorcycles used in the set. He took me to the trailer. Told the guy who took care of the bikes to show me. He explained about the cycles and what year each one was. He started one and explained how it worked. There are lots of shots from that area and marietta. Just one of those cool things you never forget!

     
  • At Tuesday, February 15, 2011 1:06:00 PM, Blogger anyjazz said…

    Thanks for your contribution to this growing legend. It is wonderful that you have such a fine memory of a treasured event. Those special memories are very often established by someone who gives an extra measure of care; takes time out to inspire a youngster. Those moments do stay with us all our lives.

     
  • At Monday, October 10, 2011 4:24:00 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said…

    we were discussing old bikes so searched david caradine,this blog is about the best found,stupid thing is we live in u.k.but i hae been to marrieta and pauls valley to buy a horse,do you hae acopy available[cd,dvd],thanks jeff

    eastwales AT aol DOT com

     
  • At Monday, October 10, 2011 5:03:00 PM, Blogger anyjazz said…

    Sorry I no longer have the DVD. The two sources listed a couple comments back are the only sources I knew of, at least as of last January.

     
  • At Thursday, January 26, 2012 2:51:00 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said…

    i used to live in the little house across from the opening scene

     
  • At Friday, January 27, 2012 10:01:00 PM, Blogger anyjazz said…

    Thanks for your comment. Funny how many people have a memory tied to that small town.

     
  • At Saturday, July 06, 2019 1:54:00 AM, Blogger Unknown said…

    My grandfather had a restaurant at Lake Murray by the Teepee Beach and I remember Brenda Vacarro coming to eat lunch there and she gave me her autograph on a napkin. It was awesome. I will never forget it.

     
  • At Saturday, July 06, 2019 6:21:00 AM, Blogger anyjazz said…

    Thanks for sharing your memory. The making of that movie touched many lives, it seems.

     

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